Carbon Capture

While there are a number of large scale Carbon capture projects in the world, one of the main reasons that Carbon Capture has not been widely adopted yet is due to the complexity and costs of operations, which are not currently offset by the cost of emitting CO2. This is a particular issue for the cement and lime industries as the cost of Carbon Capture is nearly doubling the production costs.

In order to reach the corporate and political emissions reductions targets by 2050, carbon capture technologies will need to be applied to the majority of cement plants (Cembureau 2050 Carbon Neutrality Roadmap).

 

LEILAC aims to tackle this problem, by demonstrating a technology that could replace an existing part of the cement and lime making process, and capture the pure process CO2 emissions without significant energy or capital penalty. It can also work in conjunction with other capture and emissions reduction approaches, maximising the options available.

LEILAC will contribute to providing the community with a technology that can address the dual challenges of enabling European industry to sustainably thrive while significantly lowering CO2 emissions.  

You can learn more about the LEILAC technology and in the FAQ sections of this website.

Carbon Utilisation 

Carbon Utilisation consists of a range of technologies that use or convert CO2 to make valuable fuels, feed, chemicals, building materials or other products. Some technologies require a purified (concentrated) CO2 stream, whereas others can utilise the CO2-rich exhaust gas. Such uses may enable the faster and wider deployment of capture CO2 technologies, particularly when there is a relatively small price for emitting CO2.

 

Also, not all CCU concepts have the same environmental impact, and some can permanently store the CO2 technology. The market of these products however is not large enough to cover all man-made CO2 emissions.

 

Therefore, the cement and lime sectors consider CCS inevitable to reach the EU targets. (See the FAQ for more information).

  • The Carbon Storage (CCS)

One of the most important technologies for addressing climate change is CO2 capture & storage (CCS) or, where the CO2 is not emitted, CO2 capture and utilisation & storage (CCUS). Without CCUS, global climate targets may not be obtainable, with the International Panel on Climate Change’s 5th Assessment report stating “many models could not limit likely warming to below 2°C if bioenergy, CCUS and their combination (BECCS) are limited.” These technologies associated to current use of biomass in cement or lime kilns can open the way for delivering CO2 negative emissions in these important industries.

CCUS is going to be particularly important for industries, like cement and lime , where the majority of emissions are unavoidable. In order to reach the corporate and political emissions reductions targets by 2050, carbon capture technologies will need to be applied to the majority of cement plants (CEMBUREAU 2050 Carbon Neutrality Roadmap). As noted by the 2018 IPCC report, “CCS plays a major role in decarbonizing the industry sector in the context of 1.5°C and 2°C pathways, especially in industries with higher process emissions, such as cement.

 

CCUS is a technology chain, which captures CO2 before it is emitted to the atmosphere and either uses it in different industrial applications or stores it (the amount which cannot be used) safely and deeply underground (onshore or offshore). The EU’s CCS Directive lays down extensive legal requirements for selecting and operating sites for CO2 storage. It also sets the business case framework for CCUS in Europe, as any permanently stored CO2 does not require the submission of an EU ETS allowance, currently costing €30/tonne of CO2. Worldwide several projects have been safely and permanently storing CO2 since the 1990s. This storage process uses natural mechanisms that have been ‘storing’ oil, gas or CO2 for millions of years.

While there are a number of large scale CCS projects in the world, some of the main reasons that CCS has not been widely adopted yet are due to the relatively low cost of emitting CO2 not offsetting the complexity and costs of operating the additional equipment currently required to capture the CO2. This is a particular issue for the cement and lime industries as the cost of CCS is nearly doubling the production costs.

LEILAC aims to tackle this problem, by demonstrating a technology that could replace an existing part of the cement and lime making process, and capture the pure process CO2 emissions without significant energy or capital penalty. This is, as far as we understand, a unique possibility for capturing process emissions. It can also work in conjunction with other capture and emissions reduction approaches, maximising the options available.

LEILAC will contribute to providing the global community with a technology that can address the dual challenges of enabling industry to sustainably thrive while significantly lowering CO2 emissions.  

You can learn more about CO2 storage, and how it works, here: Global CCS institute, EU CCS Directive, and in the links and FAQ sections of this website.

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This project has received € 12m of funding from Horizon 2020 program for research and innovation of the European Union under the grant agreement No 654465.