Innovation in Industrial Carbon Capture Conference 2020

About LEILAC

LEILAC (Low Emissions Intensity Lime And Cement) will pilot a breakthrough technology that has the potential to enable both Europe’s cement and lime industries to reduce their emissions dramatically while retaining, or even increasing international competitiveness.

The best available technologies for cement and lime have no carbon capture capability.  The international and EU community recognises that CO2 emissions contribute to climate change, and the most practical approach to reducing such emissions to-date for the cement and lime industries has been to increase kiln efficiencies and utilise alternative fuels. 

Role of innovation and company entrepreneurship in CCS

Following discussions on the interplay between policy makers, industry, and civil society in taking the necessary steps to decarbonise industry (see Industry working towards the Paris Agreement), Trude Sunset, the CEO of Gassnova, provided an overview of the progressive actions being taken by Norway in facilitating CCS as an effective means of decarbonisng, before moderating a session that  investigated the role that innovation and carbon capture may have in attempting to address those challenges – before examining the concrete actions been taken both by Calix and the LEILAC consortium; discussing the latest knowledge in the industrial application of carbon capture technologies, sharing key learnings , and key thoughts and industrial developments in industrial carbon capture, use and storage.

Phil Hodgson, CEO of Calix, noted the LEILAC project – with a new method of capturing unavoidable process emissions from the lime and cemet sector for very low cost – was being brough about through the active collaboration and strong support of its industrial, engineering, research, and NGO partners.

 

The successful completion of the 60m tall LEILAC pilot was dependent on the support of H2020, and vital in enabling radical steps to be taken in decarbonising hard-to-abate industry”.  

 

While another scale-up step is required to reach full commercialisation, he noted that this technology’s vision is to enahance European competitiveness and industry and decarbonise by providing a technology option that is very low cost – however, for all attempts by industry to capture its carbon (regardless of technology and cost), there is still an urgent requriement for infrastructure and societal collaboration to enable deployment.

LEILAC Pilot Plant mock-up

Trude Sunset, the CEO of Gassnova

Mirroring the discussion in the first session, Hans-Joachim Kümpel, President a.d., Acatech stressed that large scale CCU / CCS requires support from civil society, industry, politics, and unions – representing a particularly challenge in Germany. There were opportunities, risks and limitations of CCU and CCS, requiring action now.  Developing trust and understanding takes time by all actors, in order that critical decarbonisation options (which are safe and tested) are not dismissed due to misinformation or misunderstanding.

Alan Haigh, the Head Horizon 2020 of INEA

(on the right)

Alan Haigh, the Head Horizon 2020 of INEA, gave an overview of how Europe is enabling innovation. H2020’s €34.1 billion is supporting 30 projects in CCS (€249m), including the LEILAC project – moving innovative concepts from applied research, though to prototyping, then piloting (e.g. LEILAC), demonstration scale, with the aim of eventually reaching commercial deployment.

 

 

 

Jan Theulen, Director Alternative Resources at HeidelbergCement, gave a detailed overview of the carbon capture and storage projects the group is involved in, with four main messages: “that it takes decades to develop a project; that innovation drives costs down and should be supported; that entrepreneurship is required; and that each successful CCUS application gives credit to next one!”

Jan Theulen, Director Alternative Resources at HeidelbergCement (on stage)

Antti Valle, Resource Efficiency and Raw Materials at DG Grow, provided key insights into the support for long-term investment and support for CCS infrastructure, highlighting the work being undertaken in regulatory issues and resolving cross-boundary movement of CO2 – but how steps are being taken to investigate new financial instruments that may provide support for near-to-market innovation, which cannot be adequately address by the EU ETS, H2020, nor the Innovation fund.

Alan Haigh, the Head Horizon 2020 of INEA, gave an overview of how Europe is enabling innovation. H2020’s €34.1 billion is supporting 30 projects in CCS (€249m), including the LEILAC project – moving innovative concepts from applied research, though to prototyping, then piloting (e.g. LEILAC), demonstration scale, with the aim of eventually reaching commercial deployment.

Jan Theulen, Director Alternative Resources at HeidelbergCement, gave a detailed overview of the carbon capture and storage projects the group is involved in, with four main messages: “that it takes decades to develop a project; that innovation drives costs down and should be supported; that entrepreneurship is required; and that each successful CCUS application gives credit to next one!”

Antti Valle, Resource Efficiency and Raw Materials at DG Grow, provided key insights into the support for long-term investment and support for CCS infrastructure, highlighting the work being undertaken in regulatory issues and resolving cross-boundary movement of CO2 – but how steps are being taken to investigate new financial instruments that may provide support for near-to-market innovation, which cannot be adequately address by the EU ETS, H2020, nor the Innovation fund.

The session was brought to a close by Koen Coppenholle, CEMBUREAU, who commented on the pressure to reduce CO2 emissions, and how the cement industry was very hopeful for the successful development and implementation of innovative new technologies that are capable of addressing unavoidable process emissions from the sector. He noted that a lot of collaborative research and development is required to achieve success and was encouraged by the steps being taken in Europe – and looked forward to the second day of the conference that would proceed to examine a number of these developments in detail.

Conference Delegates Networking

This project has received € 12m of funding from Horizon 2020 program for research and innovation of the European Union under the grant agreement No 654465.